online curated exhibitions

Window on Weaving: Wall II

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French Crossing
Marilyn Eustice

45.5 x 40 cm
+44 07786 406 730
marilyneustice@gmail.com

This piece was inspired by a pedestrian crossing in France, where the white stripes had been combed into swirls. This struck me as particularly beautiful for such a mundane but necessary space. From a photo, I rearranged the lines for my design, some of which were changed during the process of weaving. I often find the design tells me where it wants to go as it evolves. My objective was to give the piece a feeling of movement.

The white line is a reference back to the original inspiration.

French Crossing
Marilyn Eustice

Meadow
Maggie Kateley

26 x 12.5 cm
maggiek0203@yahoo.co.uk

Meadow shows my love of our natural world and my place within it.

Meadow
Maggie Kateley

Circle
Claire Buckley

29 x 22.5 cm
claire.buckley@btinternet.com

This exhibition has taken my work in 2 directions using a range of natural threads. Designs were developed at West Dean during a Drawing short course with Matthew Harris.

'Circle' uses colour and textures to build thoughts and feelings which swirl around each other. Recycling threads from previous machine embroidery work adds texture and colour for the central circle. Circles are notoriously difficult in the strict verticals and horizontal lines of tapestry weaving. Cut fabrics build the texture across the surface and extend the edges of the work.

Circle
Claire Buckley

Ooops!
Julie Davies

20.3 x 18.5 cm; cotton, wool and linen

My tapestries are woven using cotton, wool and linen to reflect my love of the natural world. Inspiration comes from the realm of quantum physics; quantum theory embodies randomness whereby from the smallest subatomic particles, the complex world we now see materialised over time. When designing my tapestries I work with paint on large sheets of paper allowing the paint to flow and mix until images that I like emerge. I then translate those images into my woven artwork.

Ooops!
Julie Davies

Data Entrapment 2
Christine Paine

98.3 x 82 cm; wool, silk, linen, rayon, cotton and gold zari thread on a double cotton warp

In my weaving, Data Entrapment 2, a golden mesh slowly settles over a sleeping figure. The image is rich in colour with highly twisted yarns and golden threads. The figure is at rest, unaware of the net that is about to settle on her features and map her face into a digital database. This weaving reflects my fears about the disturbing world of data surveillance and facial mapping software. In contrast to the 20th century image and colours, I have included some references to the 15th-century renaissance artist Piero della Francesca who also used 'mapping' in his detailed mathematical drawings of perspective and the human face.

Data Entrapment 2
Christine Paine

Do You See The Horse
Lin Squires

42 x 57 cm

The inspiration for this piece comes from where I live where there are more horses than people. I pass them grazing in neat paddocks of trimmed grass every day. They look peaceful in their enclosures, heads down, tails swishing. But what if they are not peaceful at all? What if we cannot see the inner turmoil of a captive horse, the price it pays to suppress its feral nature. The emotion it feels when complying with our will for an entire lifetime. Its pent up desire to eat whatever it chooses and run wherever it wishes with companions that share the same language. What if we cannot see the horse at all?

Do You See The Horse
Lin Squires

When the Wind Blew
Lucy Sudgen

16 x 16 cm; monofilament fishing line
lucy@lucysugden.co.uk

'When the Wind Blew', is one of a series of small floral tapestries. This piece is woven in a monofilament fishing line, (some of which is hand-dyed), a material I enjoy using because of the aesthetic appeal it has, and the ways in which the material can be manipulated. The impact of monofilament in the environment concerns me, so I recycle all my waste with an Angling Society who fund raise for RNLI.

When the Wind Blew
Lucy Sudgen

View from Juggs Road, South Downs
Sarah McLean

54 x 25 cm; wool, silk and cotton weft
sarah.s.mclean@gmail.com

View from Juggs Road,
South Downs
Sarah McLean

Sketchbook Lines
Claire Buckley

23x 23 cm
claire.buckley@btinternet.com

This exhibition has taken my work in 2 directions using a range of natural threads. Designs were developed at West Dean during a Drawing short course with Matthew Harris.

'Sketchbook lines' is a quiet weaving. The soft grey/cream colours give harmonious feelings with the additional thread details like floating sound waves moving across the surface. The folded 'lip edge' on the left and the solid green vertical line which appears here and in 'Circle' emphasises the vertical nature of weaving.

My work explores the idea of distorting the straight lines of warp and weft but also to emphasise these qualities. I am interested in finding ways to exploit and break rules in subtle ways.

Sketchbook Lines
Claire Buckley

Apple
Marion Borthwick

17 x 16 cm

Apple
Marion Borthwick

The Wood
Marianna Mele

54 x 45.5 cm; cotton warp, wool, silk, rayon weft

The inspiration for this work comes from the natural world and my love of trees.

I have used strips of silk for the roots of the trees and grass.

I have used cotton warp, wool, silk, rayon and a variety of textured yarns to create the colours of the woodland.

The Wood
Marianna Mele